WSOP 2011 Player of the Year System Undergoes Bypass Surgery

WSOP 2011World Series of Poker (WSOP) vice-president Ty Stewart has announced that the Player of the Year points system has been given a little “bypass surgery” to “reflect the buy-in levels and field sizes of WSOP events”.

World Series of Poker (WSOP) vice-president Ty Stewart has announced that the Player of the Year points system has been given a little “bypass surgery” to “reflect the buy-in levels and field sizes of WSOP events”.

The 50-day WSOP in Las Vegas sees thousands of hopefuls flock to the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino aiming to take down the big one, but Stewart believes that the Player of the Year (POY) system needed a slight modification – becoming somewhat similar to Bluff magazine’s new scheme that “has been lauded by players as the best and most complete in the industry”.

With that in mind, the WSOP considered Bluff to be “natural partners to help us tweak our model”, with the updated system awarding points at the 54 preliminary events as well as the seven WSOP Europe tournaments based on three conditions: finishing position, buy-in and field size.

Players who cash will be awarded POY points, although the Seniors’ Championship, Ladies’ Championship and Casino Employees event are not eligible.

Bluff’s editor-in-chief Lance Bradley confirmed this, saying that “we altered the formula only slightly from our own to reflect the buy-in levels and field sizes of WSOP events”.

In doing so, he believes “the new system increases the credibility of the already prestigious WSOP Player of the Year award”.

Bradley considered the no-limit hold’em main event to be “the most difficult part of revamping the Player of the Year system” as it attracts a huge number of competitors for its $10,000 buy-in.

Therefore, it has been assigned its own system, with the winner receiving 500 POY points, the runner-up getting 350, and the bottom half of those in the money earning 25 points.

Bradley confessed that it had been tough coming up with a suitable system as the main event is “an entirely different beast”. However, he reckons “we’ve given it the proper treatment without making it so that someone can win Player of the Year simply by taking down the main event”.

Past WSOP POY winners include Daniel Negreanu, Erick Lindgren, Jeffrey Lisandro, Jeff Madsen, Tom Schneider and Frank Kassela.

Meanwhile, it may be more than a year off, but already 15 players have signed up to participate in The Big One by One Drop $1 million buy-in event for the water charity at the 43rd WSOP in July next year.

The One Drop event will surely produce one of the largest prize pools in WSOP history – if we discount the tournament-closing main event, of course, although even that could be surpassed.

Already signed up are One Drop president and founder of Cirque du Soleil Guy Laliberte, MGM-Mirage Resorts chief executive officer and four-time WSOP gold bracelet winner Bobby Baldwin, billionaire owner of the Las Vegas-based Treasure island Phil Ruffin, and Internet marketing billionaire Andy Beal, as well as a host of big-name pros.

It could well be a who’s who of stars, in fact, if the first batch of pros to sign up is anything to go by. Already committed to putting up $1 million are Doyle Bunson, Gus Hansen, Patrik Antonius, Johnny Chan, Tony Guoga, Negreanu and Tom Dwan.

Approximately 11% of the buy-in will go straight to the charity, while the normal series fees of about 10% to host the event will be overlooked.

WSOP owners Caesars Entertainment aim to enter two players – one via a smaller event that provides the entry fee and another through an unrelated casino promotion – while Quebec Casinos also has plans to give out an entry fee.