Firsts for Jachtmann and Bardah at World Series of Poker

Jan-Peter Jachtmann Picked up his First WSOP BraceletGermany’s Jan-Peter Jachtmann picked up his first World Series of Poker (WSOP) bracelet by taking down the $10,000 buy-in Pot-Limit Omaha event #39 in Las Vegas.

The 44-year-old poker magazine publisher was delighted to pocket $661,000 when defeating New York State’s Andrew Brown on the ESPN Main Stage of the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino’s Amazon Room.

Incredibly, this victory is only Jachtmann’s second cash at the series, having only recently finishing 43rd for $7,316 in this summer’s $3,000 buy-in Pot-Limit Omaha event #26.

The champion – who describes himself as a semi-professional player and semi-professional in the marketing of that magazine – could hardly contain his excitement, saying his victory was great, unbelievable.

German Publisher Wins PLO Title

You can hardly blame him, though, as he has been playing poker for more than 20 years, while it was also fitting that his triumph should arrive in Pot-Limit Omaha as he believes this is my game as he plays it almost every day.

Back to Day 3 of the event – and the first player to exit was British player John Kabbaj in 13th place for $33,794. Thereafter, Vermont’s Adam Kornuth (12th for $43,076), PLO veterans Sammy Farha (11th for $43,076), of Houston, and Ville Finland’s Wahlbeck (10th for $43,076), as well as Washington DC’s Joe Kusher (ninth for $55,525), were sent to the payout desk.

Two-time bracelet winner Jason Mercier, of Florida, hit the rail in eighth place for $72,132, while New York duo Nikolai Yakovenko (seventh for $94,442) and Benjamin Sage (sixth for $124,600) soon followed out the door.

Andrew Brown Just Misses Out

Vegas-based Andy Seth earned $165,665 in fifth, Florida’s Micah Smith pocketed $222,044 in fourth and Steven Silverman, of Washington DC, left in third for a $299,960 pay day to ensure that start-of-day chip leader Brown faced off against Jachtmann for the title.

Heads-up play started with Jachtmann holding 4,940,000 chips to Brown’s 3,850,000 and, while the counts were close, the clash didn’t last long. The final hand saw Brown, on the button, raise to 80,000 and Jachtmann make the call to see a 2 3 Q♠ flop.

Jachtmann checked, allowing Brown to fire in a bet of 160,000. But Jachtmann then check-raised to 640,000, eliciting a call from Brown to see the 9♠ turn. The Hamburg player led out for 1,100,000 and then made the call after Brown shoved all-in.

Brown showed Q♣ Q J♠ 7♠ to be in front with trip queens with the possibility of a flush, while Jachtmann’s A♣ 4♠ 5 2♠ gave the German a wrap. And, just like that, the dealer placed the A on the river to give Jachtmann a straight and the victory that denied Brown his second WSOP bracelet – although $408,393 for runner-up isn’t too shabby.

Huck Seed Exits as Bubble Boy

Day 2 started with 88 players aiming to cash, as well as advance to Day 3. However, with only 36 paid, 51 players were going to be left very disappointed, including the likes of bubble boy Huck Seed, Chris DeMaci, Brett Richey, Joe Cada, Noah Schwartz, Ben Grundy, John Racener and George Lind III.

Maybe not quite so upset, but still no doubt frustrated at not making the final day and the last 13, were Nenad Medic (36th for $16,801), Robert Williamson III (34th for $16,801), Tristan Clemencon (31st for $16,801), Allan Le (30th for $16,801), Michael Binger (28th for $16,801), Bryn Kenney (23rd for $21,015), Ted Lawson (22nd for $21,015), Alexander Kravchenko (20th for $21,015), Joe Beevers (19th for $21,015) and Allen Cunningham (17th for $26,495).

WSOP 2012 Event #39 Top 10 Payouts

  1. Jan-Peter Jachtmann (Germany) – $661,000
  2. Andrew Brown (USA) – $408,393
  3. Steven Silverman (USA) – $299,960
  4. Micah Smith (USA) – $222,044
  5. Andy Seth (USA) – $165,665
  6. Benjamin Sage (USA) – $124,600
  7. Nikolai Yakovenko (USA) – $94,442
  8. Jason Mercier (USA) – $72,132
  9. Joe Kushner (USA) – $55,525
  10. Ville Wahlbeck (Finland) – $43,076

Ronnie Bardah Boxes Clever in WSOP Event #40

Ronnie Bardah battled of the ropes to collect $182,088 and his first gold bracelet for taking down the $2,500 buy-in Limit Hold’em Six-Handed event #40 at the Rio.

The 29-year-old pro from Massachusetts took time out to train in combat sport Muay Thai while travelling across the globe, and reckons this helped him stay focused when charging back from the final table short stack to victory against California’s Marco Johnson in their heads-up meeting.

Bardah – who was born in Israel – also believes his many years of playing poker came in handy when constructing his incredible fightback at the final table, saying: I felt I had the second most experience (behind Terrence Chan) in playing Limit Hold’em. He’s played a few more limit tournaments than I have, but I felt I had the upperhand experience. Once he busted, I felt like I was the best player at the table in terms of Limit Hold’em experience.

Short Stack Fight Back For Title

Incredibly, runner-up Johnson had started the final table as the second shortest stack, but fell just short of victory to leave with $112,525.

Bardah, though, refused to the let the fact he was the shortest stack when the last 10 players resumed their battle for the bracelet on Day 3 deter him from achieving his goal by fighting hard in the Amazon Room – particularly after doubling-up on the day’s first hand.

The last seven players were moved to the Pavilion Room’s feature stage after Washington State’s Rep Porter exited in eighth place for $17,107, with Bardah now second in chips behind Day 1 and Day 2 leader Vincent Gironda, of New Jersey.

But Bardah did take over at the top when flopping trip tens before turning a full house against Gironda about 55 minutes after Canada’s Chan he fallen in seventh place for $17,107.

Champion Opens Up Gap

Thereafter, Bardah – who is nicknamed ‘RoNasty’ – began to move away from the chasing pack as his aggression saw him break through the one million mark during five-handed play, following the exit of Hans Minocha, of Kansas, in sixth for $23,648.

Toronto’s Sorel Mizzi then hit the rail in fifth for $33,541, to be joined by Illinois’ Brent Wheeler (fourth for $48,828) before the return from a dinner break saw Johnson make his move.

Gironda just couldn’t get going as his stack was blinded away and was sent to the rail in third place by Johnson for $73,040 when his A♣ 4 failed to hold against his opponent’s Q♠ 7♠ when a seven hit on the flop.

Johnson began his heads-up clash with Bardah holding a small chip advantage, but almost every pot saw the lead exchanged before the latter started to win the big pots by making some quality hands.

Big Hands for Chip Leader

He managed to flop trips with Q 2, completed a flush on the river while holding K♣ Q after a fourth club arrived, found sixes full of threes in a big pot and even nailed yet another flush with his 10 5.

Johnson was struggling to stay alive now but did battle on for a while before finally succumbing. The final hand saw Johnson, on the button, raise and big blind Bardah three-bet. Johnson made the call to see a 5 2♠ 2♣ flop. Bardah bet out and Johnson called to see the A♣ turn.

All the chips hit the middle after this card, with Johnson holding a flush draw with J♣ 7♣ and Bardah finding two pair with A 4♠. Bardah only had to avoid a club on the river for victory – and the A♠ was perfect as he completed a full house.

WSOP Event #40 Top 10 Payouts

  1. Ronnie Bardah (Israel) – $182,088
  2. Marco Johnson (USA) – $112,525
  3. Vincent Gironda (USA) – $73,040
  4. Brent Wheeler (USA) – $48,828
  5. Sorel Mizzi (Canada) – $33,541
  6. Hans Minocha (USA) – $23,648
  7. Terrence Chan (Canada) – $17,107
  8. Rep Porter (USA) – $17,107
  9. Chad Brown (USA) – $12,682
  10. Joep van den Bijgaart (Netherlands) – $12,682